A Charitable Scientific Data Collection

How are you coping with the coronavirus pandemic?

TAKE PART IN THE SURVEY

The Challenge

The coronavirus pandemic is an unprecedented crisis facing the world. People around the world are adapting their daily lives and fear lock-ins, shortages of food and other essential goods, as well as severe illness and death. At the same time, some people do not appear at all to be worried about getting infected and disregard official advice and policies.

What implications will this coronavirus pandemic have on the daily lives of people around the world? How will it affect the mental health, consumption and eating habits, social cohesion as well as expectations towards politics and public administration? And how will these factors develop over time as new information about the virus emerges and new measures are implemented by states?

Politics, medicine and academia do not have answers to these new questions. However, scientifically-valid answers to these questions are of critical importance for dealing with the pandemic for maintaining health, nutrition and social peace around the world. Only those measures that are accepted by citizens will be followed.

Life with Corona captures the voices and moods of affected citizens around the world, collecting data to provide answers to these questions. Life with Corona is a charitable open access citizen science project based on rigorous academic methods. The data will be made available for academic non-profit analyses.

Life With Corona

Take Part in the Global Survey

Life with Corona includes various modules that allow a comprehensive insight into daily life during the pandemic.

Featured Insights

Survey highlights week 20

  • Support for COVID-19 related measures placed by the government is falling.
  • Nearly half of US respondents think they should have priority access to a coronavirus vaccine if it is developed in their country.
  • Social distancing is the greatest impact of coronavirus crisis for the Europeans and Americans, whereas Africans and Asians worry more about getting sick.

The proportion of people wearing face masks is on the rise in Germany.

Even before the wearing of masks was made compulsory in enclosed spaces in Germany, their use was increasing.

Does exposure to the virus change what we think about people and organizations?

Those who had contact with someone who might have the virus have worse perceptions of the medical sector, their neighbors, and the media than the wider population.

Does exposure to the virus influence behaviors around the disease?

Those who might have been exposed to the disease are more likely to use more measures to stop the spread of the disease.

Latest Posts

Survey highlights week 20

  • Support for COVID-19 related measures placed by the government is falling.
  • Nearly half of US respondents think they should have priority access to a coronavirus vaccine if it is developed in their country.
  • Social distancing is the greatest impact of coronavirus crisis for the Europeans and Americans, whereas Africans and Asians worry more about getting sick.

The proportion of people wearing face masks is on the rise in Germany.

Even before the wearing of masks was made compulsory in enclosed spaces in Germany, their use was increasing.

Does exposure to the virus change what we think about people and organizations?

Those who had contact with someone who might have the virus have worse perceptions of the medical sector, their neighbors, and the media than the wider population.

Does exposure to the virus influence behaviors around the disease?

Those who might have been exposed to the disease are more likely to use more measures to stop the spread of the disease.

Where should a vaccine be made available first?

Those exposed to the virus are more likely to support priority access to a vaccine in their own country.

Stockpiling in Germany is on a downward trend

Nearly two in five respondents admitted stockpiling at the start of the survey. That had fallen by more than half by last weekend. Does this, truly, capture a downward trend? Or were supermarket closures because of public holidays at work in the data? Tell us your experiences by answering the survey!

Stockpiling by age breakdown

Older people are more likely to stockpile than younger people.

Stockpiled vs unavailable products

People are not stockpiling the goods that are most commonly unavailable.